Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Emerg Med. 2001 Aug;38(2):160-9.

The Canadian CT Head Rule Study for patients with minor head injury: rationale, objectives, and methodology for phase I (derivation).

Author information

  • 1Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Y 4E9.

Abstract

Head injuries are among the most common types of trauma seen in North American emergency departments, with an estimated 1 million cases seen annually. "Minor" head injury (sometimes known as "mild") is defined by a history of loss of consciousness, amnesia, or disorientation in a patient who is conscious and talking, that is, with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13 to 15. Although most patients with minor head injury can be discharged without sequelae after a period of observation, in a small proportion, their neurologic condition deteriorates and requires neurosurgical intervention for intracranial hematoma. The objective of the Canadian CT Head Rule Study is to develop an accurate and reliable decision rule for the use of computed tomography (CT) in patients with minor head injury. Such a decision rule would allow physicians to be more selective in their use of CT without compromising care of patients with minor head injury. This paper describes in detail the rationale, objectives, and methodology for Phase I of the study in which the decision rule was derived. [Stiell IG, Lesiuk H, Wells GA, McKnight RD, Brison R, Clement C, Eisenhauer MA, Greenberg GH, MacPhail I, Reardon M, Worthington J, Verbeek R, Rowe B, Cass D, Dreyer J, Holroyd B, Morrison L, Schull M, Laupacis A, for the Canadian CT Head and C-Spine Study Group. The Canadian CT Head Rule Study for patients with minor head injury: rationale, objectives, and methodology for phase I (derivation). Ann Emerg Med. August 2001;38:160-169.]

PMID:
11468612
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk