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Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2001 Jul;20(7):646-53.

Human parainfluenza virus-associated hospitalizations among children less than five years of age in the United States.

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  • 1Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Human parainfluenza viruses 1 through 3 (HPIV-1-3) are important causes of respiratory tract infections in young children. This study sought to provide current estimates of HPIV-1-3-associated hospitalizations among US children.

METHODS:

Hospitalizations for bronchiolitis, bronchitis, croup and pneumonia among children age <5 years were determined for the years 1979 through 1997 using the National Hospital Discharge Survey. Average annual hospitalizations during the last 4 years of the study for each of these four diseases were multiplied by the proportions of each disease associated with HPIV-1-3 infection (as previously reported in hospital-based studies) to estimate hospitalizations potentially associated with HPIV-1-3 infections. Seasonal trends in HPIV-1-3-associated hospitalizations were compared with HPIV detections in the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System, which prospectively monitors respiratory viral detections throughout the United States.

RESULTS:

The proportions of hospitalizations associated with HPIV infection for each disease varied widely in the 6 hospital-based studies we selected. Consequently our annual estimated rates of hospitalization were broad: HPIV-1, 0.32 to 1.59 per 1,000 children; HPIV-2, 0.10 to 0.86 per 1,000 children; and HPIV-3, 0.48 to 2.6 per 1,000 children. Based on these data HPIV-1 may account for 5,800 to 28,900 annual hospitalizations; HPIV-2 for 1,800 to 15,600 hospitalizations; and HPIV-3 for 8,700 to 52,000 hospitalizations.

CONCLUSIONS:

We provide broad, serotype-specific estimates of US childhood hospitalizations associated with HPIV infections. More precise estimates of HPIV-associated hospitalizations would require large prospective studies of HPIV-associated diseases by more sensitive viral testing methods, such as polymerase chain reaction techniques.

PMID:
11465835
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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