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Viscoelastic properties of the human colon.

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  • 1Gastroenterology Research Unit and Enteric Neurosciences Program, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. bharucha.adil@mayo.edu

Abstract

Our objectives were to characterize colonic viscoelastic properties of the human descending colon by assessing pressure-volume (P-V) relationships during barostatic balloon distension. In 16 healthy subjects, a balloon was inflated to 44 mmHg and then deflated to 0 mmHg in 4-mmHg steps at 10, 30, and 60 ml/min, allowing volume fluctuations to stabilize at each pressure increment. Thereafter, these "quasi-static" P-V curves were compared with "dynamic" distensions to 300 ml, at 1 and 10 ml/s, before and after intravenous atropine in another five subjects. During quasi-static curves, balloon volume stabilized at each pressure increment. Quasi-static P-V curves were reproducible within individuals and approximated to a power exponential function and revealed hysteresis, indicative of viscoelasticity. Body mass index influenced quasi-static P-V curves during inflation but not during deflation. The colon was less compliant during dynamic distensions at 10 ml/s than during quasi-static distensions. Atropine increased quasi-static compliance and attenuated differences between quasi-static and rapid distensions. We conclude that colonic viscoelastic properties can be assessed by quasi-static P-V curves. Rapid colonic distension activated neural reflexes, thereby reducing colonic compliance compared with quasi-static distensions.

PMID:
11447026
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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