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Stroke. 2001 Jul;32(7):1673-7.

Vitamin D deficiency and risk of hip fractures among disabled elderly stroke patients.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, Kurume University Medical Center, Japan. noukenrs@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Risk of hip fracture after stroke is 2 to 4 times that in a reference population. Osteomalacia is present in some patients with hip fractures in the absence of stroke, while disabled elderly stroke patients occasionally have severe deficiency in serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) (</=5 ng/mL). To determine the effects of vitamin D status on hip fracture risk, we prospectively studied a cohort of patients with hemiplegia after stroke who were aged at least 65 years.

METHODS:

We compared baseline serum indices of bone metabolism, bone mineral density, and hip fracture occurrence in stroke patients with serum 25-OHD </=25 nmol/L (</=10 ng/mL; deficient group, n=88) with findings in patients from the same cohort who had 25-OHD levels 26 to 50 nmol/L (10 to 20 ng/mL; insufficient group, n=76) or >/=51 nmol/L (>/=21 ng/mL; sufficient group, n=72).

RESULTS:

Over a 2-year follow-up interval, hip fractures on the paretic side occurred in 7 patients in the deficient group and 1 patient in the insufficient group (P<0.05; hazard ratio=6.5), while no hip fractures occurred in the sufficient group. The 7 hip fracture patients in the deficient group had an osteomalacic 25-OHD level of <5 ng/mL. Higher age and severe immobilization were noted in the deficient group. Serum 25-OHD levels correlated positively with age, Barthel Index, and serum parathyroid hormone.

CONCLUSIONS:

Elderly disabled stroke patients with serum 25-OHD concentrations </=12 nmol/L (</=5 ng/mL) have an increased risk of hip fracture. Immobilization and advanced age cause severe 25-OHD deficiency and consequent reduction of BMD.

PMID:
11441218
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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