Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2001 May;13(5):529-34.

Treatment of refractory hepatic hydrothorax with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: long-term results in 40 patients.

Author information

  • 1Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital, Freiburg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Hepatic hydrothorax is a complication of portal hypertension secondary to ascites. In this study, we investigated retrospectively the effects of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on hepatic hydrothorax refractory to diuretic treatment.

METHODS:

Forty patients (Child-Pugh class B, 24 patients; Child-Pugh class C, 16 patients) with hydrothorax refractory to diuretic treatment, pleurocenteses or pleurodesis were included. The TIPS implantation was successful in all patients, who were then followed for 16 +/- 14 months (range 1 day-54 months).

RESULTS:

TIPS reduced the portosystemic pressure gradient from 26 +/- 6 to 10 +/- 5 mmHg. In the 17 patients whom we followed for 12 months or longer, improvements were found for the Child--Pugh score (8.6 +/- 1.8 v. 6.7 +/- 1.5), serum albumin concentration (3.1 +/- 0.5 v. 3.6 +/- 0.5 g/l), and urinary sodium excretion (22 +/- 29 v. 89 +/- 43 mmol/24 h) (P< 0.05). Two patients developed severe hepatic encephalopathy requiring shunt occlusion. Hydrothorax improved in 82% of patients and resolved in 71% of patients. Fifty per cent of patients developed shunt insufficiency within 7 +/- 9 months, contributing to a probability of relapse-free 1-year survival of 35%. In these patients, shunt revision resulted in a secondary response rate of 82.3%. The 1-year survival was 64%. Both hydrothorax response and survival showed a significant inverse correlation with age over 60 years (P< 0.01 and P< 0.003, respectively) but not with other biomedical variables.

CONCLUSION:

TIPS is effective for hydrothorax refractory to diuretic treatment and other standard interventions to bridge the time to transplantation. Patients older than 60 years have a poor response and short survival.

PMID:
11396532
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk