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Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Jun 1;153(11):1064-70.

Vitamin supplement use and fatal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among US men and women.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Shumin.Zhang@channing.harvard.edu

Abstract

The authors evaluated the association between use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only and multivitamins and fatal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a large prospective mortality study of US men and women. During 14 years of follow-up (1982-1996), 1,571 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma deaths among 508,351 men and 1,398 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma deaths among 676,306 women were documented. Long-term regular use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only and multivitamins was unrelated to fatal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among either men or women. The multivariate relative risks for men who used supplements for 10 or more years were 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.54, 2.00) for vitamin A supplements, 1.04 (95% CI: 0.78, 1.39) for vitamin C supplements, 1.06 (95% CI: 0.74, 1.51) for vitamin E supplements, and 1.14 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.40) for multivitamins. The multivariate relative risks for women who used supplements for 10 or more years were 1.40 (95% CI: 0.77, 2.54) for vitamin A supplements, 1.19 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.60) for vitamin C supplements, 1.27 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.84) for vitamin E supplements, and 1.21 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.50) for multivitamins. All associations became weaker when vitamin supplements were mutually adjusted. These findings do not support an important relation between long-term regular use of individual supplements of vitamins A, C, and E only and multivitamins and fatal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

PMID:
11390324
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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