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Am J Public Health. 2001 May;91(5):805-7.

Racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking professional mental health services.

Author information

  • 1Department of Mental Hygiene, Johns Hopkins University, 111 Market Pl, Room 3059, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA. diala@maxinter.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study examined racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking mental health services.

METHODS:

Data from the National Comorbidity Survey, which administered a structured diagnostic interview to a representative sample of the US population (N = 8098), were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression was used, and data were stratified by need for mental health services.

RESULTS:

African Americans with depression were more likely than Whites with depression to "definitely go" (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, P < .001) seek mental health services. African Americans with severe psychiatric disorders were less likely to be "somewhat embarrassed if friends knew they sought care" (OR = 0.3, P < .001) than were their White counterparts.

CONCLUSIONS:

African Americans reported more positive attitudes toward seeking mental health services than did Whites.

PMID:
11344893
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1446685
Free PMC Article
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