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J Nutr. 2001 May;131(5):1568-73.

Dietary trans fatty acids combined with a marginal essential fatty acid status during the pre- and postnatal periods do not affect growth or brain fatty acids but may alter behavioral development in B6D2F(2) mice.

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  • 1Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada N2L 3G1.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate whether dietary trans fatty acids (TFA) during the pre- and postnatal periods would exacerbate the effects of marginal essential fatty acid (EFA) status on growth, brain long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) and behavioral development in B6D2F(2) mice. Pregnant B6D2F(1) females were randomly assigned to one of the following three diets: marginal EFA plus 22% trans 18:1 (mEFA + TFA); marginal EFA (mEFA); and control (CON). The total 18:1 content in all diets was similar. The offspring were weaned and maintained on the same diets. Both the mEFA and mEFA + TFA groups had reduced growth and brain weight compared with CON, but did not differ from one another. As expected, the mEFA and mEFA + TFA groups had reduced docosahexaenoic acid [DHA; 22:6(n-3)]) and increased 22:5(n-6) concentrations in brain phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) compared with the CON group, but again did not differ from one another. Reversal learning in the T-water maze was significantly slower in the mEFA + TFA groups compared with the mEFA group and both were slower than the CON group. These findings illustrate that TFA combined with a marginal EFA status do not exacerbate the effects of marginal EFA status on growth or brain LC-PUFA. However, long-term effects of dietary TFA during the pre- and postnatal period on behavioral development and neural function should be investigated in future studies.

PMID:
11340117
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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