Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Am J Pathol. 2001 May;158(5):1803-8.

Comparative genomic hybridization identifies loss of 18q22-qter as an early and specific event in tumorigenesis of midgut carcinoids.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Carcinoid tumors are rare neuroendocrine tumors occurring in the lung or in the digestive tract where they are further subclassified as foregut, midgut, or hindgut carcinoids. To gain a better understanding of the genetic basis of the different types of carcinoid tumors, we have characterized numerical imbalances in a series of midgut carcinoids, and compared the results to previous findings in carcinoids from the lung. Numerical imbalances were revealed in 16 of the 18 tumors, and the most commonly detected aberrations were losses of 18q22-qter (67%), 11q22-q23 (33%), and 16q21-qter (22%), and gain of 4p14-qter (22%). The total number of alterations found in the metastases was significantly higher than in the primary tumors, indicating the accumulation of acquired genetic changes in the tumor progression. Losses of 18q and 11q were present both in primary tumors and metastases, whereas loss of 16q and gain of 4 were only detected in metastases. Furthermore, the pattern of comparative genomic hybridization alterations varied depending on the total number of detected alterations. Taken together, the findings would suggest a progression of numerical imbalances, in which loss of 18q and 11q represent early events, and loss of 16q and gain of 4p are late events in the tumor progression of midgut carcinoids. When compared to previously published comparative genomic hybridization abnormalities in lung carcinoids, loss of 11q was found to occur in both tumor types, whereas loss of 18q and 16q and gain of 4 were not revealed in lung carcinoids. The results indicate that inactivation of a putative tumor suppressor gene in 18q22-qter represents a frequent and early event that is specific for the development of midgut carcinoids.

PMID:
11337378
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1891959
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (2)Free text

Figure 1.
Figure 2.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk