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Urology. 2001 May;57(5):966-9.

Glansectomy: an alternative surgical treatment for Buschke-Löwenstein tumors of the penis.

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  • 1Department of Urology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To present the surgical excision of the glans penis (glansectomy) as an alternative surgical treatment to penectomy. Buschke-Löwenstein tumors of the penis include the entities described in published reports as verrucous carcinoma and giant condyloma acuminatum of the penis. Both types are well-differentiated tumors, typically confined to the glans penis, with distinctly rare metastatic activity.

METHODS:

The study included 7 patients, 40 to 63 years of age, with exophytic, papillary lesions involving the glans penis. Biopsy led to the diagnosis of verrucous carcinoma in 4 patients and giant condyloma acuminatum in 3 patients. All patients reported normal erectile function. Because of the low malignant potential of the tumor and its confinement to the glans penis, a simple glansectomy was performed in all patients to preserve the maximal penile length and functional integrity of the corpora cavernosa.

RESULTS:

The postoperative course was uncomplicated. With 18 to 65 months of follow-up, all patients were disease free. One patient required more aggressive treatment because of local recurrence of the tumor. All patients returned to normal sexual activity 1 month postoperatively. The only change during sexual activity, noted by two of the patients' partners, was vaginal pain, possibly due to the absence of the glans.

CONCLUSIONS:

Glansectomy may be considered the treatment of choice in patients with Buschke-Löwenstein tumors of the penis, with more radical techniques reserved for second-line treatment.

PMID:
11337304
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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