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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 May 8;98(10):5804-8. Epub 2001 May 1.

Low IGF-I suppresses VEGF-survival signaling in retinal endothelial cells: direct correlation with clinical retinopathy of prematurity.

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  • 1Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Ophthalmology, and International Pediatric Growth Research Center, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, 41685 Göteborg, Sweden.

Abstract

Retinopathy of prematurity is a blinding disease, initiated by lack of retinal vascular growth after premature birth. We show that lack of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in knockout mice prevents normal retinal vascular growth, despite the presence of vascular endothelial growth factor, important to vessel development. In vitro, low levels of IGF-I prevent vascular endothelial growth factor-induced activation of protein kinase B (Akt), a kinase critical for endothelial cell survival. Our results from studies in premature infants suggest that if the IGF-I level is sufficient after birth, normal vessel development occurs and retinopathy of prematurity does not develop. When IGF-I is persistently low, vessels cease to grow, maturing avascular retina becomes hypoxic and vascular endothelial growth factor accumulates in the vitreous. As IGF-I increases to a critical level, retinal neovascularization is triggered. These data indicate that serum IGF-I levels in premature infants can predict which infants will develop retinopathy of prematurity and further suggests that early restoration of IGF-I in premature infants to normal levels could prevent this disease.

PMID:
11331770
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC33294
Free PMC Article
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