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J Hum Nutr Diet. 2001 Apr;14(2):121-8.

Consumption of soup and nutritional intake in French adults: consequences for nutritional status.

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  • 1Institut Scientifique et Technique de la Nutrition et de l'Alimentation, Conservatoire National des Arts et M├ętiers, Paris, France.

Abstract

AIM:

The impact of soup consumption on nutrient intake and nutritional indicators was assessed in adults who consumed soup compared to those who did not or who were occasional eaters.

METHODS:

Data were obtained for 2,188 men and 2,849 women living in France and participating in the SU.VI.MAX cohort, who reported twelve 24-h dietary records during a 2-year follow-up period (60,444 records). Subjects were divided into three groups: (1) those who ate soup 0-2 days or less out of 6 days were classified as occasional or non-consumers; (2) those who consumed soup 3-4 days out of 6 were defined as regular consumers; (3) those who consumed soup 5-6 days out of 6 were defined as heavy consumers.

RESULTS:

Seven per cent of women and 9% of men were heavy consumers of soup. Respectively, 46 and 42% were regular, and 47 and 49% were occasional or non-consumers. Mean energy intake was lower in heavy consumers than in occasional or non-consumers, but the difference was statistically significant only in women. In men and women, heavy consumers of soup had significantly higher intakes of carbohydrates than occasional and non-consumers (245 g J(-1) vs. 227 g J(-1) in men; 186 g J(-1) vs. 176 g J(-1) in women) and lower lipid intakes (97 g J(-1) vs. 102 g J(-1) in men; 80 g J(-1) vs. 75 g J(-1) in women). Soup consumers presented lower energy intake at dinner than light or non-consumers. In soup consumers, breakfast and lunch contained greater amounts of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, but dinner contained significantly smaller amounts of lipids and proteins. A higher frequency of BMI > 27 kg m(-2) was found in occasional and non-soup consumers; conversely a higher frequency of BMI between 23 and 27 kg m(-2) was found in regular consumers of soup and a higher frequency of BMI < 23 kg m(-2) in heavy consumers. For women, an association was found between occasional or non- consumers and BMI > 25 kg m(-2) and between heavy consumers and BMI < 22 kg m(-2). Likewise an association was found in men only between heavy consumption of soup and lower value of serum cholesterol.

CONCLUSION:

The present data suggest that the consumption of soups contributes to a balanced diet. Consumption of soup may be beneficial for a healthy nutritional status in the overall population.

PMID:
11330261
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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