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Am Fam Physician. 2001 Apr 15;63(8):1567-72.

Prevention and treatment of dog bites.

Author information

  • Department of Family Medicine, Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Florida 32224, USA.

Abstract

Almost one half of all dog bites involve an animal owned by the victim's family or neighbors. A large percentage of dog bite victims are children. Although some breeds of dogs have been identified as being more aggressive than other breeds, any dog may attack when threatened. All dog bites carry a risk of infection, but immediate copious irrigation can significantly decrease that risk. Assessment for the risk of tetanus and rabies virus infection, and subsequent selection of prophylactic antibiotics, are essential in the management of dog bites. The dog bite injury should be documented with photographs and diagrams when appropriate. Family physicians should educate parents and children on ways to prevent dog bites.

PMID:
11327433
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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