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J Bacteriol. 2001 May;183(10):3117-26.

A Phosphopantetheinyl transferase homolog is essential for Photorhabdus luminescens to support growth and reproduction of the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora.

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  • 1Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA.

Abstract

The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is a symbiont of the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. The nematode requires the bacterium for infection of insect larvae and as a substrate for growth and reproduction. The nematodes do not grow and reproduce in insect hosts or on artificial media in the absence of viable P. luminescens cells. In an effort to identify bacterial factors that are required for nematode growth and reproduction, transposon-induced mutants of P. luminescens were screened for the loss of the ability to support growth and reproduction of H. bacteriophora nematodes. One mutant, NGR209, consistently failed to support nematode growth and reproduction. This mutant was also defective in the production of siderophore and antibiotic activities. The transposon was inserted into an open reading frame homologous to Escherichia coli EntD, a 4'-phosphopantetheinyl (Ppant) transferase, which is required for the biosynthesis of the catechol siderophore enterobactin. Ppant transferases catalyze the transfer of the Ppant moiety from coenzyme A to a holo-acyl, -aryl, or -peptidyl carrier protein(s) required for the biosynthesis of fatty acids, polyketides, or nonribosomal peptides. Possible roles of a Ppant transferase in the ability of P. luminescens to support nematode growth and reproduction are discussed.

PMID:
11325940
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC95212
Free PMC Article
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