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Sleep. 2001 May 1;24(3):293-300.

The short-term benefits of brief and long naps following nocturnal sleep restriction.

Author information

  • 1Flinders University, Adelaide, S.A., Australia.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

The purpose was to remedy the lack of experimental studies directly comparing the effects of brief and long daytime naps following nocturnal sleep restriction.

DESIGN:

Twelve young adult healthy sleepers participated in a repeated measures design comparing the effects of no nap, a 10-minute nap, and a 30-minute afternoon nap in each case following a night of 4.7 hours of total sleep time. Objective and subjective alertness measures and cognitive performance measures were taken before, then 5, 35, and 60 minutes after the termination of the nap.

SETTING:

N/A.

PARTICIPANTS:

N/A.

INTERVENTIONS:

N/A. MEASUREMENTS and

RESULTS:

In the no nap condition measures showed either no change or a decreases of alertness and performance across the testing period. Following the 10-minute nap there was an immediate improvement in subjective alertness and cognitive performance which was sustained for the hour of post nap testing. Immediately following the 30 minute nap most measures of alertness and performance declined but showed some recovery by the end of testing.

CONCLUSIONS:

Because the delayed benefits following the 30-minute nap may be due to sleep inertia, longer post-nap testing periods should be investigated. However, we conclude that the detrimental effects of sleep restriction were more rapidly and significantly ameliorated, at least within the hour following the nap, by a 10-minute afternoon nap.

PMID:
11322712
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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