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J Leukoc Biol. 2001 Apr;69(4):513-21.

Chemokines in cutaneous wound healing.

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  • 1Department of Dermatology, University of W├╝rzburg Medical School, Germany. gillitzer-r.derma@mail.uni-wuerzburg.de

Abstract

Healing of wounds is one of the most complex biological events after birth as a result of the interplay of different tissue structures and a large number of resident and infiltrating cell types. The latter are mainly constituted by leukocyte subsets (neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, and lymphocytes), which sequentially infiltrate the wound site and serve as immunological effector cells but also as sources of inflammatory and growth-promoting cytokines. Recent data demonstrate that recruitment of leukocyte subtypes is tightly regulated by chemokines. Moreover, the presence of chemokine receptors on resident cells (e.g., keratinocytes, endothelial cells) indicates that chemokines also contribute to the regulation of epithelialization, tissue remodeling, and angiogenesis. Thus, chemokines are in an exclusive position to integrate inflammatory events and reparative processes and are important modulators of human-skin wound healing. This review will focus preferentially on the role of chemokines during skin wound healing and intends to provide an update on the multiple functions of individual chemokines during the phases of wound repair.

PMID:
11310836
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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