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Mol Microbiol. 2001 Apr;40(2):294-305.

Type IV secretion: intercellular transfer of macromolecules by systems ancestrally related to conjugation machines.

Author information

  • Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, The University of Texas-Houston Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Peter.J.Christie@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

Bacterial conjugation systems are highly promiscuous macromolecular transfer systems that impact human health significantly. In clinical settings, conjugation is exceptionally problematic, leading to the rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and other virulence traits among bacterial populations. Recent work has shown that several pathogens of plants and mammals - Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bordetella pertussis, Helicobacter pylori and Legionella pneumophila - have evolved secretion pathways ancestrally related to conjugation systems for the purpose of delivering effector molecules to eukaryotic target cells. Each of these systems exports distinct DNA or protein substrates to effect a myriad of changes in host cell physiology during infection. Collectively, secretion pathways ancestrally related to bacterial conjugation systems are now referred to as the type IV secretion family. The list of putative type IV family members is increasing rapidly, suggesting that macromolecular transfer by these systems is a widespread phenomenon in nature.

PMID:
11309113
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3922410
Free PMC Article

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