Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
N Engl J Med. 2001 Apr 12;344(15):1132-8.

The teratogenicity of anticonvulsant drugs.

Author information

  • 1Pediatric Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114-2696, USA. holmes.lewis@mgh.harvard.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The frequency of major malformations, growth retardation, and hypoplasia of the midface and fingers, known as the anticonvulsant embryopathy, is increased in infants exposed to anticonvulsant drugs in utero. However, whether the abnormalities are caused by the maternal epilepsy itself or by exposure to anticonvulsant drugs is not known.

METHODS:

We screened 128,049 pregnant women at delivery to identify three groups of infants: those exposed to anticonvulsant drugs, those unexposed to anticonvulsant drugs but with a maternal history of seizures, and those unexposed to anticonvulsant drugs with no maternal history of seizures (control group). The infants were examined systematically for the presence of major malformations, signs of hypoplasia of the midface and fingers, microcephaly, and small body size.

RESULTS:

The combined frequency of anticonvulsant embryopathy was higher in 223 infants exposed to one anticonvulsant drug than in 508 control infants (20.6 percent vs. 8.5 percent; odds ratio, 2.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 9.7). The frequency was also higher in 93 infants exposed to two or more anticonvulsant drugs than in the controls (28.0 percent vs. 8.5 percent; odds ratio, 4.2; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 5.1). The 98 infants whose mothers had a history of epilepsy but took no anticonvulsant drugs during the pregnancy did not have a higher frequency of those abnormalities than the control infants.

CONCLUSIONS:

A distinctive pattern of physical abnormalities in infants of mothers with epilepsy is associated with the use of anticonvulsant drugs during pregnancy, rather than with epilepsy itself.

PMID:
11297704
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk