Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Br J Gen Pract. 2001 Jan;51(462):15-8.

Chronic fatigue in general practice: economic evaluation of counselling versus cognitive behaviour therapy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, King's College of Medicine, London. chisholmD@who.int

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a paucity of evidence relating to the cost-effectiveness of alternative treatment responses to chronic fatigue.

AIM:

To compare the relative costs and outcomes of counselling versus cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) provided in primary care settings for the treatment of fatigue.

DESIGN OF STUDY:

A randomised controlled trial incorporating a cost-consequences analysis.

SETTING:

One hundred and twenty-nine patients from 10 general practices across London and the South Thames region who had experienced symptoms of fatigue for at least three months.

METHOD:

An economic analysis was performed to measure costs of therapy, other use of health services, informal care-giving, and lost employment. The principal outcome measure was the Fatigue Questionnaire; secondary measures were the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a social adjustment scale.

RESULTS:

Although the mean cost of treatment was higher for the CBT group (164 Pounds, standard deviation = 67) than the counselling group (109 Pounds, SD = 49; 95% confidence interval = 35 to 76, P < 0.001), a comparison of change scores between baseline and six-month assessment revealed no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of aggregate health care costs, patient and family costs or incremental cost-effectiveness (cost per unit of improvement on the fatigue score).

CONCLUSIONS:

Counselling and CBT both led to improvements in fatigue and related symptoms, while slightly reducing informal care and lost productivity costs. Counselling represents a less costly (and more widely available) intervention but no overall cost-effectiveness advantage was found for either form of therapy.

PMID:
11271867
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1313893
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk