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Brain Inj. 2001 Mar;15(3):189-209.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) 10-20 years later: a comprehensive outcome study of psychiatric symptomatology, cognitive abilities and psychosocial functioning.

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  • 1The National Institute for the Rehabilitation of the Brain Injured, Israel. mshoofi@mscc.huji.ac.il

Abstract

The goal of this study was to measure the very long-term mental and psychosocial outcomes of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Seventy-six persons with severe TBI were evaluated extensively by means of standardized scales, neuropsychological tests and evaluations by family members, at an average of 14.1 (SD = 5.5) years post-injury. Six mental and functional domains were examined: psychiatric symptomatology, cognitive abilities, vocational status, family integration, social functioning, and independence in daily routines. The findings indicate a long-term differential effect of severe TBI, with seriously affected psychiatric symptomatology, family and social domains, as compared to moderately influenced cognitive, vocational and independent functioning. Relatively high rates of depression, psychomotor slowness, loneliness and family members' sense of burden were found. In addition to their epidemiological importance, the results indicate that persons with TBI and their families may need professional assistance to maintain a reasonable psychosocial quality of life, even more than a decade post-injury.

PMID:
11260769
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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