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Rofo. 2001 Feb;173(2):92-6.

[Percutaneous transpapillary extraction of biliary calculi for symptomatic choledocholithiasisafter unsuccessful endoscopic treatment].

[Article in German]

Author information

  • 1Institut für Röntgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Universität Regensburg.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Evaluation of a percutaneous transhepatic treatment of symptomatic choledocholithiasis in bile ducts that cannot be reached with the endoscope.

METHODS:

From January 1996 to August 2000 a transhepatic extraction of biliary calculus was performed in four patients. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was not successful in any of the cases. Clinical symptoms were icterus in four cases, additional cholangitis or colics in two cases. First, a balloon dilation of the papilla was performed by a percutaneous transhepatic approach. For removal of bile duct stones, occlusion catheters and Dormia baskets were used. Technical success was defined as complete removal of bile duct stones. Clinical success was defined as normalization of cholestasis and inflammation parameters. In the follow-up an ultrasound examination was performed and blood samples were taken for control of cholestasis parameters.

RESULTS:

In all four cases treatment was technically and clinically successful. For complete removal of biliary calculus a second intervention was necessary in two cases. In each case an internal to external drainage was left over a mean of 7 days (3-13 days). In the mean follow-up of 30.5 months (6-50 months) all patients had persistent relief of symptoms. No further interventions were necessary. No complications were present.

CONCLUSION:

Percutaneous transpapillary extraction of biliary calculus is an effective alternative to surgery in patients with bile ducts, that cannot be reached with the endoscope.

PMID:
11253093
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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