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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Mar;82(3):311-5.

Positive outcomes in traumatic brain injury-vegetative state: patients treated with bromocriptine.

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  • 1Healthsouth Rehabilitation Hospital, Dothan, AL, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effects of multidisciplinary rehabilitation interventions and use of bromocriptine on outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury-vegetative state (TBI-VS).

DESIGN:

Retrospective review of clinical cases.

SETTING:

Free-standing rehabilitation hospital; Acute and extended rehabilitation hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Five consecutive TBI-VS patients, as well as 33 TBI-VS patients and 37 traumatic brain injury-minimally conscious state (TBI-MCS) patients reported in the literature.

INTERVENTIONS:

Bromocriptine administration, systematic neuropsychologic testing, sensory stimulation, and traditional comprehensive rehabilitation with physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Disability Rating Scale (DRS) at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury and FIM instrument scores at 1 month and 12 months postinjury, Coma Recovery Scale, and Barry Rehabilitation Inpatient Screening of Cognition.

RESULTS:

The 5 TBI-VS patients emerged from a VS into a MCS and regained functional status. Their recovery of physical and cognitive functioning, as rated by the DRS, was greater than previously reported in the literature for patients in a VS or MCS at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury.

CONCLUSION:

Bromocriptine administration, systematic neuropsychologic testing, sensory stimulation, a comprehensive rehabilitation program, or a combination of these treatments may enhance functional recovery in this TBI-VS patient group. Further systematic study to quantify the contribution of these variables and to reproduce this data in a larger patient population should be performed.

PMID:
11245751
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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