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Am J Med Genet. 2001 Mar 15;99(3):210-6.

Trisomy 20 mosaicism in two unrelated girls with skin hypopigmentation and normal intellectual development.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City 84132, USA.

Abstract

The prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 20 mosaicism presents a challenge for practitioners and parents. The diagnosis implies an uncertain risk for an inconsistent set of physical and developmental findings, as well as a substantial chance for a child that is normal physically and developmentally. We report two girls (ages nine years one month and eight years one month) with normal intelligence and hypopigmented skin areas. Both girls were born after a prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 20 mosaicism in amniocytes. Case 1 had 83% and 57% trisomy 20 cells from two separate amniocenteses and Case 2 had 90% trisomy 20 cells from an amniocentesis. Trisomy 20 was confirmed after birth in urinary sediment (25%) and chorionic villus cells (15%) in Case 1, while cord blood lymphocytes (30 cells) and skin fibroblasts (50 cells) had only 46,XX cells. Trisomy 20 was confirmed after birth in urinary sediment (100%), placenta (100%), cord (10%), amniotic membrane (50%), and skin fibroblasts (30%) in Case 2, while cord blood lymphocytes (100 cells) had only 46,XX cells. This is the first report of a hypopigmented pigmentary dysplasia associated with isolated trisomy 20 mosaicism. Our patients are the oldest reported children with trisomy 20 mosaicism confirmed after birth.

Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss. Inc.

PMID:
11241492
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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