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Transplantation. 2001 Feb 15;71(3):402-5.

Reduced transfusion requirements by recombinant factor VIIa in orthotopic liver transplantation: a pilot study.

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  • 1Department of Anaesthesiology, and Trial Coordination Centre, University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Large transfusion requirements, i.e., excessive blood loss, during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are correlated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recombinant factor VIIa (rF-VIIa) has been shown to improve hemostasis in a variety of conditions, but has never been studied in liver transplantation.

METHODS:

We performed a single-center, open-label, pilot study in adult patients undergoing OLT for cirrhosis Child-Pugh B or C, to assess efficacy and safety of rFVIIa. rFVIIa (80 microg/kg) was administered at the start of the operation, to be repeated according to predefined criteria. Packed red blood cells (RBC), fresh-frozen plasma, and platelet concentrates were administered according to predefined criteria. Perioperative transfusion requirements in study patients were compared with matched controls.

RESULTS:

Six patients were enrolled in the study. All received a single dose of rFVIIa. Transfusion requirements (given as median, with range in parentheses) were lower in the study group than in matched controls: 1.5 (0-5) vs. 7 (2-18) units of allogeneic RBC (P=0.006), 0 (0-2) vs. 3.5 (0-23) units of autologous RBC (P=0.043), total amount of RBC 3 (0-5) vs. 9 (4-40) units (P=0.002). Transfused fresh-frozen plasma was 1 (0-7) vs. 8 (2-35) units (P=0.011). Blood loss was 3.5 L (1.4-5.3) vs. 9.8 L (3.7-35.0) (P=0.004). One study patient developed a hepatic artery thrombosis at day 1 postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS:

A single dose of 80 microg/kg rFVIIa significantly reduced transfusion requirements during OLT. Further study is needed to establish the optimally effective and safe dose of rFVIIa in orthotopic liver transplantation.

PMID:
11233901
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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