Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Endocrinol Invest. 2000 Dec;23(11):727-31.

Bone turnover in hyperthyroidism before and after thyrostatic management.

Author information

  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Turin, Italy.

Abstract

Hyperthyroidism is associated with enhanced osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity, and patients frequently have low bone mineral density and high bone turnover. The aim of this study was to examine the bone formation and resorption markers trend in 12 female patients, before and after normalization of thyroid activity. The following measurements were made at baseline and 1 and 6 months after hormone normalization induced by methimazole treatment: total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP), collagen type C-terminal propeptide (PICP), osteocalcin (BGP), telopeptide (ICTP), urinary-hydroxyproline/urinary creatinine (uOHP/uCreat), urinary calcium/urinary creatinine (uCa/uCreat) and deoxypyridinoline crosslinks (D-Pyr). Compared with controls, all of these parameters were significantly increased (ALP p = 0.014; BALP p = 0.0001; PICP p = 0.013; BGP p = 0.009; ICTP p = 0.0001; uOHP/uCreat p = 0.002; uCa/uCreat p = 0.044; crosslinks p = 0.0001). After treatment the values of ALP, BALP and PICP in hyperthyroid patients showed an initial slight increase and then a significant downwards trend (ALP p = 0.008, BAP p = 0.001, PICP p = 0.026). Furthermore, resorption markers showed a significant decrease (uOHP/ uCreat p < 0.005 and D-Pyr p < 0.008). As regards lumbar BMD patients, measurements were significantly reduced in comparison with the control group (p = 0.005). Six months after serum thyroid hormones level normalization, we observed a significant increase (p=0.014 vs baseline). Both neoformation and resorption markers are useful to assess pathological bone turnover and bone involvement in hyperthyroidism. They could also be employed to monitor the effect of antithyroid treatment on bone and to indicate if bone antiresorption therapy should be considered.

PMID:
11194705
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk