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J Urol. 2001 Mar;165(3):805-7.

Eosinophilic cystitis in adults.

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  • 1Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We describe the largest clinical experience with the diagnosis and management of largely anecdotally reported eosinophilic cystitis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Five women and 12 men 18 to 84 years with proved eosinophilic cystitis were treated in a 23-year period. Some combination of hematuria, irritative voiding, dysuria and suprapubic pain was present in 14 cases (82%). The remaining 3 patients (18%) were asymptomatic and the diagnosis was made by cystoscopy done because of a history of bladder carcinoma. Available data included no peripheral eosinophilia in 10 of 10 patients studied, pyuria in 12 (92%), microhematuria in 11 of 13 (84%), sterile urine in all 17, abnormal urine cytology in 2 of 17 (12%), bilateral hydronephrosis in 1 and a bladder mass or thickening in 2. Cystoscopy showed erythema in all cases and tumor-like lesions or edema in 3 (17.6%). Histological studies revealed eosinophilic cystitis in all 17 patients, while in 1 with no history of bladder carcinoma eosinophilic cystitis coexisted with carcinoma.

RESULTS:

Two patients were lost to followup and the remaining 15 were followed 1 to 37 months. After biopsy and fulguration of the lesions 10 patients received no further treatment, including 6 with complete symptom resolution and 1 with improvement. The 3 asymptomatic patients with a history of bladder carcinoma remained asymptomatic and disease-free. Another 4 patients underwent medical therapy and improved, of whom 1 had recurrence that was successfully re-treated medically. The remaining patient, who was symptomatic, underwent cystoprostatectomy for end stage bladder disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Manifestations of eosinophilic cystitis indistinguishably mimic those of other inflammatory and malignant bladder disorders that may precede or coexist with it. The condition usually follows a benign course in most cases but occasionally its relentless progression causes crippling disease.

PMID:
11176473
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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