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Heart Lung. 2001 Jan-Feb;30(1):39-46.

Use of biological markers of airway inflammation to detect the efficacy of nurse-delivered asthma education.

Author information

  • 1Department of Community Health Systems, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to determine whether analysis of the constituents of induced sputum could be used to document the efficacy of a nurse-delivered patient education intervention and whether changes in the biological markers of inflammation in sputum would correlate with improvements in pulmonary function and symptoms.

DESIGN:

The study design was prospective, open trial with repeated measures.

SETTING:

The study took place at a West Coast academic medical center laboratory.

SUBJECTS:

Subjects included 12 nonsmoking persons with asthma, ages 23 to 51 years, on prescribed daily anti-inflammatory inhaled therapy who had not required oral prednisone in the previous 4 weeks of enrollment.

METHOD:

The effect of one 30-minute asthma education session on spirometry, peak flow, symptoms, and biological markers of inflammation in sputum was tested for 8 weeks to determine whether biological markers reflect the efficacy of educational interventions.

RESULTS:

Mean symptom scores decreased and lung function increased slightly over 8 weeks. Markers of eosinophil degranulation decreased by 50% and albumin by 25% from baseline to 8 weeks. Eosinophil percentages dropped 20% over time but did not change consistently at all time points. Clinical markers of asthma control correlated in the low-to-moderate range with biological markers of airway inflammation.

CONCLUSION:

The results of this study show the effects of a patient education intervention can be detected in both clinical and biological outcomes. Individual education may influence self-care of asthma including adherence to inhaled corticosteroid therapy and thereby suppress airway inflammation.

PMID:
11174366
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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