Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Behav Brain Res. 2001 Jan 8;118(1):61-5.

Cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout mice fail to self-administer morphine but not other drugs of abuse.

Author information

  • 1B.B.Brodie Department of Neuroscience, University of Cagliari, Via Porcell 4, 09124, Cagliari, Italy.

Abstract

The rewarding effects of morphine, cocaine, amphetamine and nicotine were evaluated in CB1 receptor knockout mice by means of an intravenous self-administration model. Experiments were carried out on drug-naive animals using a nose-poking response (NPR)-like as operandum. The results of the present study indicate that morphine did not induce intravenous self-administration in mutant CB1 receptor knockout mice, whereas it was significantly self-administered by the corresponding wild type mice. On the contrary, cocaine, amphetamine and nicotine were self-administered to the same extent by both wild type and CB1 receptor knockout mice. These data clearly indicate that the CB1 cannabinoid receptor is essential not only for the expression of cannabinoid reinforcing effects but also for the modulation of morphine rewarding effects. The specificity of such interaction is supported by the finding that contrary to morphine, cocaine, d-amphetamine and nicotine were self-administered by mice at the same extent either in presence or in absence of the CB1 receptor.

PMID:
11163634
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk