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J Immunol. 2001 Feb 15;166(4):2311-6.

Peripheral deletion after bone marrow transplantation with costimulatory blockade has features of both activation-induced cell death and passive cell death.

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  • 1BMT Section, Transplantation Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129, USA.

Abstract

Two major pathways of death of previously activated T cells have been described: activation-induced cell death can be triggered by restimulating activated T cells with high concentrations of Ag, is Fas-dependent, is not influenced by proteins of the Bcl family, and is blocked by cyclosporin A; in contrast, passive cell death is induced by the withdrawal of growth factors and activation stimuli, is Fas-independent, and is blocked by Bcl family proteins. We examined the role of these two forms of cell death in the peripheral deletion of donor-reactive host T cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and costimulatory blockade with anti-CD154 plus CTLA4Ig in two murine models. The substantial decline in donor-reactive CD4 cells seen in wild-type recipients 1 wk after bone marrow transplantation with costimulatory blockade was largely inhibited in Fas-deficient recipients and in Bcl-x(L)-transgenic recipients. We observed these effects both in a model involving low-dose total body irradiation and a conventional dose of bone marrow, and in a radiation-free regimen using high-dose bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, cyclosporin A did not completely block the deletion of donor-reactive CD4(+) T cells in recipients of bone marrow transplantation with costimulatory blockade. Thus, the deletion of donor-reactive T cells occurring early after bone marrow transplantation with costimulatory blockade has features of both activation-induced cell death and passive cell death. Furthermore, these in vivo data demonstrate for the first time the significance of in vitro results indicating that proteins of the Bcl family can prevent Fas-mediated apoptosis under certain circumstances.

PMID:
11160287
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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