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CMAJ. 2000 Nov 14;163(10):1247-51.

Intervening to reduce weight gain in pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus in Cree communities: an evaluation.

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  • 1School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal, Que. gray-donald@macdonald.mcgill.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A high prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes has been observed among the Cree of James Bay, Quebec. To address this problem, a diet and activity intervention during pregnancy, which was based on social learning theory, was initiated in 4 Cree communities.

METHODS:

A prospective intervention compared dietary, weight and glycemic indicators for 107 control subjects and for 112 women who received the intervention during the course of their pregnancy. A control period in 4 communities (July 1995-March 1996) was followed by an intervention period (April 1996-January 1997) when subjects were offered regular, individual diet counselling, physical activity sessions and other activities related to nutrition.

RESULTS:

The intervention and control groups did not differ at baseline regarding their mean age (24.3 years [SD 6.29] v. 23.8 years [SD 5.86]), mean prepregnancy weight (81.0 kg [SD 19.46] v. 78.9 kg [SD 17.54]) and mean gestational age at recruitment (17.1 weeks [SD 7.06] v. 18.5 weeks [SD 6.92]). The intervention did not result in differences in diet measured at 24-30 weeks' gestation, rate of weight gain over the second half of pregnancy (0.53 kg per week [SD 0.32] v. 0.53 kg per week [SD 0.27]) or plasma glucose level (50 g oral glucose screen) between 24 and 30 weeks (7.21 mmol/L [SD 2.09] v. 7.43 mmol/L [SD 2.10]). Mean birth weights were similar (3741 g [SD 523] v. 3686 g [SD 686]), as was maternal weight at 6 weeks post partum (88.1 kg [SD 16.8] v. 86.4 kg [SD 19.0]). The only changes in dietary intake were a reduction in caffeine (pregnancy) and an increase in folate (post partum).

INTERPRETATION:

This intervention had only a minor impact on diet; finding ways of encouraging appropriate body weight and activity levels remains a challenge.

Comment in

PMID:
11107459
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC80308
Free PMC Article
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