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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Nov;183(5):1049-58.

A multicenter controlled trial of fetal pulse oximetry in the intrapartum management of nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns.

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA 92863-1491, USA. tjgarite@uci.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Recent developments permit the use of pulse oximetry to evaluate fetal oxygenation in labor. We tested the hypothesis that the addition of fetal pulse oximetry in the evaluation of abnormal fetal heart rate patterns in labor improves the accuracy of fetal assessment and allows safe reduction of cesarean deliveries performed because of nonreassuring fetal status.

STUDY DESIGN:

A randomized, controlled trial was conducted concurrently in 9 centers. The patients had term pregnancies and were in active labor when abnormal fetal heart rate patterns developed. The patients were randomized to electronic fetal heart rate monitoring alone (control group) or to the combination of electronic fetal monitoring and continuous fetal pulse oximetry (study group). The primary outcome was a reduction in cesarean deliveries for nonreassuring fetal status as a measure of improved accuracy of assessment of fetal oxygenation.

RESULTS:

A total of 1010 patients were randomized, 502 to the control group and 508 to the study group. There was a reduction of >50% in the number of cesarean deliveries performed because of nonreassuring fetal status in the study group (study, 4. 5%; vs. control, 10.2%; P =.007). However, there was no net difference in overall cesarean delivery rates (study, n = 147 [29%]; vs. control, 130 [26%]; P = .49) because of an increase in cesarean deliveries performed because of dystocia in the study group. In a blinded partogram analysis 89% of the study patients and 91% of the control patients who had a cesarean delivery because of dystocia met defined criteria for actual dystocia. There was no difference between the 2 groups in adverse maternal or neonatal outcomes. In terms of the operative intervention for nonreassuring fetal status, there was an improvement in both the sensitivity and the specificity for the study group compared with the control group for the end points of metabolic acidosis and need for resuscitation.

CONCLUSION:

The study confirmed its primary hypothesis of a safe reduction in cesarean deliveries performed because of nonreassuring fetal status. However, the addition of fetal pulse oximetry did not result in an overall reduction in cesarean deliveries. The increase in cesarean deliveries because of dystocia in the study group did appear to result from a well-documented arrest of labor. Fetal pulse oximetry improved the obstetrician's ability to more appropriately intervene by cesarean or operative vaginal delivery for fetuses who were actually depressed and acidotic. The unexpected increase in operative delivery for dystocia in the study group is of concern and remains to be explained.

Comment in

PMID:
11084540
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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