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J Nucl Med. 2000 Nov;41(11):1842-8.

Does cerebral blood flow decline in healthy aging? A PET study with partial-volume correction.

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  • 1Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

It remains a matter of controversy as to whether cerebral perfusion declines with healthy aging. In vivo imaging with PET permits quantitative evaluation of brain physiology; however, previous PET studies have inconsistently reported aging reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen metabolism, and glucose metabolism. In part, this may be because of a lack of correction for the dilution effect of age-related cerebral volume loss on PET measurements.

METHODS:

CBF PET scans were obtained using [15O]H2O in 27 healthy individuals (age range, 19-76 y) and corrected for partial-volume effects from cerebral atrophy using an MR-based algorithm.

RESULTS:

There was a significant difference (P = 0.01) in mean cortical CBF between young/midlife (age range, 19-46 y; mean +/- SD, 56+/-10 mL/100 mL/min) and elderly (age range, 60-76 y; mean +/- SD, 49+/-2.6 mL/100 mL/min) subgroups before correcting for partial-volume effects. However, this group difference resolved after partial-volume correction (young/midlife: mean +/- SD, 62+/-10 mL/100 mL/min; elderly: mean +/- SD, 61+/-4.8 mL/100 mL/min; P = 0.66). When all subjects were considered, a mild but significant inverse correlation between age and cortical CBF measurements was present in the uncorrected but not the corrected data.

CONCLUSION:

This study suggests that CBF may not decline with age in healthy individuals and that failure to correct for the dilution effect of age-related cerebral atrophy may confound interpretation of previous PET studies that have shown aging reductions in physiologic measurements.

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PMID:
11079492
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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