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Prev Med. 2000 Nov;31(5):575-83.

Cultural barriers to mammography, clinical breast exam, and breast self-exam among Chinese-American women 60 and older.

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  • 1Ruttenberg Cancer Center, Box 1130, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York 100029, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study examined screening utilization at least once and regular adherence to mammography, clinical breast exam, and breast self-exam among older Chinese-American women.

METHOD:

One hundred women were recruited from senior centers in two metropolitan cities. Participants completed a questionnaire that included sections on demographics, health history, health insurance coverage, breast cancer screening, common and cultural barriers to screening, and acculturation.

RESULTS:

Logistic regression models found insurance coverage for mammography and acculturation to be significant predictors of having had a mammogram at least once. Low perceived need/lack of physician recommendation and recency of physical examination were significant predictors of having had a mammogram in the past year. Acculturation and modesty were significant predictors of having had a clinical breast exam at least once, while recency of physical examination was a significant predictor of having had a clinical breast exam in the past year. Reliance on medial professionals for screening and forgetting were significant predictors of having performed breast self-exam at least once, and forgetting was a significant predictor of regular performance of breast self-exam.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that both common and cultural barriers play a role in breast cancer screening among older Chinese-American women, with cultural factors being more influential in the initiation of cancer screening behavior.

Copyright 2000 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

PMID:
11071839
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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