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Mech Dev. 2000 Nov;98(1-2):77-94.

Large-scale screen for genes controlling mammalian embryogenesis, using high-throughput gene expression analysis in mouse embryos.

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  • 1Max-Planck-Institut für Immunbiologie, Abt. Entwicklungsbiologie, Stübeweg 51, 79108, Freiburg, Germany.

Abstract

We have adapted the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique to perform high-throughput gene expression analysis in mouse embryos. A large-scale screen for genes showing specific expression patterns in the mid-gestation embryo was carried out, and a large number of genes controlling development were isolated. From 35760 clones of a 9.5 d.p.c. cDNA library, a total of 5348 cDNAs, enriched for rare transcripts, were selected and analyzed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Four hundred and twenty-eight clones revealed specific expression patterns in the 9.5 d.p.c. embryo. Of 361 tag-sequenced clones, 198 (55%) represent 154 known mouse genes. Thirty-nine (25%) of the known genes are involved in transcriptional regulation and 33 (21%) in inter- or intracellular signaling. A large number of these genes have been shown to play an important role in embryogenesis. Furthermore, 24 (16%) of the known genes are implicated in human disorders and three others altered in classical mouse mutations. Similar proportions of regulators of embryonic development and candidates for human disorders or mouse mutations are expected among the 163 new mouse genes isolated. Thus, high-throughput gene expression analysis is suitable for isolating regulators of embryonic development on a large-scale, and in the long term, for determining the molecular anatomy of the mouse embryo. This knowledge will provide a basis for the systematic investigation of pattern formation, tissue differentiation and organogenesis in mammals.

PMID:
11044609
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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