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Can J Vet Res. 2000 Oct;64(4):212-21.

An evaluation of chemical arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint in the horse by using monoiodoacetate.

Author information

  • 1Department of Veterinary Anesthesiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. Jan.Penraat@admin3.usask.ca

Abstract

The use of monoiodoacetate (MIA) for arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIJ) and the effect of exercise on the degree of fusion were investigated. Eight horses received 3 injections (Weeks 0, 3, 6) of MIA (2 mL; 60 mg/mL) into the right or left front PIJ. Peri-operatively, the horses received phenylbutazone, butorphanol, and abaxial sesamoidean nerve blocks to relieve pain. During the study, the horses were monitored for general health, lameness, and swelling around the injection area. Radiographs were taken biweekly to evaluate bony fusion. Horses were randomly divided into non-exercised and exercised groups. Exercise consisted of 20 minutes of trotting on a treadmill (4 m/s), 3 days per week for 13 weeks. The horses were euthanized at 24 weeks. Slab sections of the PIJ were evaluated grossly and radiographically for bony fusion. Histologic examinations were performed to evaluate articular cartilage. Three horses were excluded from the study after developing soft tissue necrosis around the injection site, septic arthritis, and necrotic tendinitis. The remaining horses remained healthy, developed a grade 1 to 4 lameness with minimal to severe swelling in the PIJ region. All 5 horses showed radiographic evidence of bony fusion, however, no fusion was present when injected joints were examined on postmortem examination. Histologic examination revealed thinning of the cartilage, diffuse necrosis of chondrocytes, with the calcified zone intact. Subjectively, exercise did not influence the degree of cartilage destruction. Based on this study, chemical arthrodesis cannot be advocated in clinical cases because of the high complication rate and lack of bony fusion.

PMID:
11041498
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1189620
Free PMC Article
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