Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Dis Child. 2000 Nov;83(5):408-12.

Community acquired pneumonia--a prospective UK study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Paediatrics, Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. paula@medmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are few data on paediatric community acquired pneumonia (PCAP) in the UK.

AIMS:

To investigate the aetiology and most useful diagnostic tests for PCAP in the north east of England.

METHODS:

A prospective study of hospital admissions with a diagnosis of PCAP.

RESULTS:

A pathogen was isolated from 60% (81/136) of cases, and considered a definite or probable cause of their pneumonia in 51% (70/136). Fifty (37%) had a virus implicated (65% respiratory syncytial virus) and 19 (14%) a bacterium (7% group A streptococcus, 4% Streptococcus pneumoniae), with one mixed infection. Of a subgroup (51 patients) in whom serum antipneumolysin antibody testing was performed, 6% had evidence of pneumococcal infection, and all were under 2 years old. The best diagnostic yield was from paired serology (34%, 31/87), followed by viral immunofluorescence (33%, 32/98).

CONCLUSION:

Viral infection accounted for 71% of the cases diagnosed. Group A streptococcus was the most common bacterial infective agent, with a low incidence of both Mycoplasma pneumoniae and S pneumoniae. Pneumococcal pneumonia was the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia in children under 2 years but not in older children. Inflammatory markers and chest x ray features did not differentiate viral from bacterial pneumonia; serology and viral immunofluorescence were the most useful diagnostic tests.

PMID:
11040149
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1718544
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk