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Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(4):CD002842.

Cognitive rehabilitation for attention deficits following stroke.

Author information

  • 1School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, UK, NG7 2RD. nbl@psychology.nottingham.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Attention problems occur following stroke and are treated using computerised activities or paper and pencil tasks.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the effects of cognitive rehabilitation for attention deficits following stroke.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register, Medline, EMBASE, CINHAL and CLIN PSYCH databases and reference lists from relevant articles. Date of most recent searches: December 1998

SELECTION CRITERIA:

Controlled trials of attention training in stroke. Studies with mixed aetiology groups were excluded unless they included more than 75% of stroke patients or separate data were available for the stroke patients.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Two reviewers extracted trial data and assessed trial quality. Reviewers contacted investigators for further details of trials.

MAIN RESULTS:

Two trials were identified with 56 participants. The two trials showed a benefit of training on measures of alertness and sustained attention. Only one trial included a measure of functional independence and this showed no significant effect of training.

REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS:

There is some indication that training improves alertness and sustained attention but no evidence to support or refute the use of cognitive rehabilitation for attention deficits to improve functional independence following stroke.

PMID:
11034773
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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