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BJOG. 2000 Oct;107(10):1271-5.

One stop clinic for assessment of risk for fetal anomalies: a report of the first year of prospective screening for chromosomal anomalies in the first trimester.

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  • 1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Harold Wood Hospital, Romford, Essex, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the introduction of a one stop multidisciplinary clinic for screening for fetal chromosomal abnormalities in the first trimester by a combination of maternal serum biochemistry and ultrasonography providing a risk of chromosomal abnormalities within a one hour clinic visit.

DESIGN:

One year retrospective review of screening performance.

POPULATION:

All women attending for routine antenatal care. The population included 4,190 singleton pregnancies in women of all ages screened between 10 weeks and 3 days and 13 weeks and 6 days of gestation between the periods 1 June 1998 and 31 May 1999 in a district general hospital antenatal clinic.

METHODS:

All women booked into the clinic were offered screening by a combination of maternal serum free beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) and pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) and fetal nuchal translucency thickness. Women at increased risk of carrying a fetus with trisomy 21 or trisomy 18/13 (> or =1 in 300 at sampling) were offered counselling and an invasive diagnostic procedure. Follow up of the outcome of all pregnancies was carried out.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The detection rate for trisomy 21, trisomy 18/13 and all aneuploides, false positive rate, uptake of screening, uptake of chorionic villus sampling in women identified at increased risk and fetal loss after chorionic villus sampling.

RESULTS:

Overall 97.6% of the women (4,088/4,190) accepted first trimester screening. The rate of detection of trisomy 21 was 86% (6/7), for trisomy 18/13 100% (9/9) and for all aneuploides 95% (18/19). Fetal death at presentation was found in 1.6% of pregnancies (69/4,088). Of women who accepted screening, 6.1% (257/4,088) presented too late for fetal nuchal translucency measurement and 6.5% of the women (271/4,088) presented too early. The false positive rate was 6.7% (253/3,762). Uptake of invasive testing was 83% (207/253).

CONCLUSION:

First trimester prenatal screening for chromosomal abnormalities using a combination of maternal serum biochemistry and fetal nuchal translucency thickness can achieve detection rates in excess of 90%. These services can be provided in a one stop multidisciplinary clinic.

PMID:
11028580
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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