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Brain Lang. 2000 Oct 15;75(1):17-33.

Oral dyspraxia in inherited speech and language impairment and acquired dysphasia.

Author information

  • 1Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. k.j.alcock@city.ac.uk

Abstract

Half of the members of the KE family suffer from an inherited verbal dyspraxia. The affected members of the family have a lasting impairment in phonology and syntax. They were given various tests of oral praxis to investigate whether their deficit extends to nonverbal movements. Performance was compared to adult patients with acquired nonfluent dysphasia, those with comparable right-hemisphere lesions, and age-matched controls. Affected family members and patients with nonfluent dysphasia were impaired overall at performing oral movements, particularly combinations of movements. It is concluded that affected members of the KE family resemble patients with acquired dysphasia in having difficulties with oral praxis and that speech and language problems of affected family members arise from a lower level disorder.

Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

PMID:
11023636
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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