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Blood. 2000 Sep 15;96(6):2012-21.

Isolation and characterization of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells in 5q-deleted myelodysplastic syndromes: evidence for involvement at the hematopoietic stem cell level.

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  • 1Stem Cell Laboratory, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, and the Department of Hematology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.


Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and frequent progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Within MDS, 5q- syndrome constitutes a distinct clinical entity characterized by an isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 (5q-), a relatively good prognosis, and infrequent transformation to acute leukemia. The cell of origin in 5q- syndrome as well as in other 5q-deleted MDS patients has not been established, but evidence for involvement of multiple myeloid (but not lymphoid) lineages has suggested that a myeloid-restricted progenitor rather than a pluripotent (lympho-myeloid) stem cell might be the primary target in most patients. Although in 9 patients no evidence of peripheral blood T-cell and only 1 case of B-cell involvement was found, the data herein support that 5q deletions occur in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with a combined lympho-myeloid potential. First, in all investigated patients a minimum of 94% of cells in the minor CD34(+)CD38(-) HSC compartment were 5q deleted as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Second, in 3 of 5 patients 5q aberrations were detected in a large fraction (25% to 90%) of purified CD34(+)CD19(+) pro-B cells. Furthermore, extensive functional characterization with regard to responsiveness to early-acting cytokines, long-term culture-initiating cells, and nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency repopulating cells supported that MDS HSCs in 5q-deleted patients are CD34(+)CD38(-), but inefficient at reconstituting hematopoiesis.

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