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Am J Psychiatry. 2000 Sep;157(9):1406-12.

Adolescent personality disorders associated with violence and criminal behavior during adolescence and early adulthood.

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  • 1New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York 10032, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

A community-based, longitudinal prospective study was conducted to investigate whether personality disorders during adolescence are associated with elevated risk for violent behavior during adolescence and early adulthood.

METHOD:

A community-based sample of 717 youths from upstate New York and their mothers were interviewed in 1983, 1985-1986, and 1991-1993. Axis I and II disorders were assessed in 1983 and 1985-1986. Antisocial personality disorder was not assessed because most participants were less than 18 years of age in 1983 and 1985-1986. Violent behavior was assessed in 1985-1986 and 1991-1993.

RESULTS:

Adolescents with a greater number of DSM-IV cluster A or cluster B personality disorder symptoms were more likely than other adolescents in the community to commit violent acts during adolescence and early adulthood, including arson, assault, breaking and entering, initiating physical fights, robbery, and threats to injure others. These associations remained significant after controlling for the youths' age and sex, for parental psychopathology and socioeconomic status, and for co-occurring psychiatric disorders during adolescence. Paranoid, narcissistic, and passive-aggressive personality disorder symptoms during adolescence were independently associated with risk for violent acts and criminal behavior during adolescence and early adulthood after the covariates were controlled.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cluster A and cluster B personality disorders and paranoid, narcissistic, and passive-aggressive personality disorder symptoms during adolescence may increase risk for violent behavior that persists into early adulthood.

PMID:
10964855
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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