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Am J Ophthalmol. 2000 Jun;129(6):734-9.

Measurement of microcirculation in the optic nerve head by laser speckle flowgraphy and scanning laser Doppler flowmetry.

Author information

  • 1Department of Ophthalmology, Niigata University School of Medicine, Niigata, Japan. arasan@med.niigata-u.ac.jp

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate and compare blood flow measurements by laser speckle flowgraphy and scanning laser Doppler flowmetry in the optic nerve head of normal volunteers.

METHODS:

This prospective study included 60 eyes of 60 normal volunteers (50.0 years; range, 21 to 77 years). Measurements were taken at the temporal neuroretinal rim away from visible vessels. The square blur rate, a quantitative index of relative blood velocity, was measured by laser speckle flowgraphy. Using scanning laser Doppler flowmetry, volume, flow, and velocity were measured at the same neuroretinal rim locations.

RESULTS:

The average square blur rate, volume, flow, and velocity were 7.11 +/- 1.65, 7.74 +/- 3.19, 151.85 +/- 70.63, and 0.53 +/- 0. 23 arbitrary units, respectively (n = 60). Square blur rate correlated significantly with flow and velocity (r =.361, P =.005; r =.359, P =.005, respectively). However, there was no significant correlation between square blur rate and volume (r =.101, P =.441). Although square blur rate decreased significantly with increasing age (r = -.375, P =.003), volume, flow, or velocity showed no significant correlation with age (r = -.249, P =.054; r = -.166, P =. 205; r = -.143, P =.275, respectively). Square blur rate also decreased significantly with mean blood pressure (r = -.315, P =. 014), but volume, flow, or velocity showed no significant correlation with mean blood pressure (r = -.159, P =.225; r = -.059, P =.654; r = -.043, P =.742, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

We found only a weak correlation between the blood flow indexes, as measured by laser speckle flowgraphy and scanning laser Doppler flowmetry because of basic differences in the principles of measurement.

PMID:
10926981
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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