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Fertil Steril. 2000 Jul;74(1):49-58.

Polycystic ovaries in adolescents and the relationship with menstrual cycle patterns, luteinizing hormone, androgens, and insulin.

Author information

  • 1Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. m.vanhooff@azvu.nl

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the possible role of inappropriate LH secretion, hyperandrogenism, and hyperinsulinemia in the development of polycystic ovaries (PCO) and the polycystic ovary syndrome.

DESIGN:

Observational.

SETTING:

General population samples.

PARTICIPANTS:

58 adolescents with regular menstrual cycles, 50 with irregular menstrual cycles, and 29 with oligomenorrhea (age 16.7+/-0.9 years).

INTERVENTIONS:

Transabdominal pelvic ultrasonography and vena puncture.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

PCO; LH, androstenedione, and testosterone levels; overnight fasting insulin concentrations; and oligomenorrhea.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of PCO increased significantly with the irregularity of the menstrual cycle pattern, as illustrated by the study, finding PCO in 9% of the girls with regular menstrual cycles, 28% of those with irregular menstrual cycles, and 45% of oligomenorrheic girls. The LH and androgen concentrations were significantly higher in girls with PCO; the insulin levels and the glucose-insulin ratio did not differ when the girls with PCO were compared with girls with normal ovaries. Oligomenorrheic girls with PCO had the highest androgen and LH concentrations; their insulin concentrations and glucose-insulin ratio were in the same range as girls with regular menstrual cycles and normal ovaries; and both their hip and waist girths were wider, although their waist-hip ratio was normal.

CONCLUSIONS:

PCO in adolescents is associated with irregular menstrual cycles, oligomenorrhea, and/or high androgen and LH levels; but no relationship was found with the insulin level or glucose-insulin ratio. Thus, it is doubtful that hyperinsulinemia is an important factor in the development of PCO or polycystic ovary syndrome.

Comment in

PMID:
10899496
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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