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Ann Intern Med. 2000 Jul 18;133(2):123-7.

Body size and risk for clinical fractures in older women. Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group.

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  • 1Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Hennepin County Medical Center, and School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55415, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Small body size predicts hip fractures in older women.

OBJECTIVE:

To test the hypothesis that small body size predicts the risk for other clinical fractures.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Population-based listings in four areas of the United States.

PATIENTS:

8059 ambulatory nonblack women 65 years of age or older.

MEASUREMENTS:

Weight, weight change since 25 years of age, body mass index, lean body mass and percent body fat, and nonspine fractures during 6.4 years of follow-up.

RESULTS:

Compared with women in the highest quartile of weight, women in the lowest quartile had relative risks of 2.0 (95% CI, 1.5 to 2.8) for hip fractures, 2.3 (CI, 1.1 to 4.7) for pelvis fractures, and 2.4 (CI, 1.5 to 3.9) for rib fractures. Adjustment for total-hip bone mineral density eliminated the elevated risk. Results were similar for other body size measures. Smaller body size was not a risk factor for humerus, elbow, wrist ankle, or foot fractures.

CONCLUSIONS:

Total body weight is useful in the prediction of hip, pelvis, and rib fractures when bone mineral density has not been measured.

Comment in

PMID:
10896638
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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