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Clin Nephrol. 2000 Jun;53(6):437-44.

Prediction of pregnancy outcome in subgroups of women with renal disease.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tiqva, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The preconception and intraconception parameters that are relevant to outcome in women with underlying renal disease remain controversial.

SUBJECTS, MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We analyzed the types and frequencies of short- and long-term (2 years after delivery) maternal and neonatal complications in 38 patients with primary renal disease (46 pregnancies), 24 IDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy (24 pregnancies), and 27 patients with a functioning renal allograft (42 pregnancies), most of them with mild renal insufficiency. Logistic regression models were formulated to predict successful outcome.

RESULTS:

Successful pregnancy outcome (live, healthy infant without severe handicap 2 years after delivery) was observed in 98% of the patients with primary renal disease, 96% of the IDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy, and 89% of the patients with a functioning renal allograft. Factors found to be significantly predictive of successful outcome were absence of preexisting hypertension in all groups, in addition to low preconception serum uric acid level in the primary renal disease patients, and long interval from transplantation to conception and use of a low dose ofprednisone in the renal transplant patients.

CONCLUSION:

Most women with different subtypes of renal disease have a successful pregnancy outcome with proper prenatal care. Worse pregnancy outcome was observed in women with moderate or severe renal failure. Fitted logistic models may provide useful guidelines for counseling women with preexisting renal disease about their prospects for a successful pregnancy in terms of immediate and long-term maternal and neonatal outcome.

PMID:
10879663
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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