Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Jun 1;56(2-3):161-6.

Survival of osmotic and acid stress by Listeria monocytogenes strains of clinical or meat origin.

Author information

  • 1MIRINZ Food Technology & Research Ltd., Hamilton, New Zealand. g.dykes@mirinz.org.nz

Abstract

The ability of 30 Listeria monocytogenes strains, 15 of meat origin and 15 of clinical origin, to use carnitine as an osmoprotectant and to resist acid stress was determined. All strains examined were able to use carnitine as an osmoprotectant, indicating the importance of this characteristic to the survival of L. monocytogenes in natural environments. Clinical and meat strains, however, differed with respect to this characteristic. Specifically, 73% of meat strains reached a lower maximum cell density in the presence of carnitine with osmotic stress than in its absence with no stress. Only 33% of clinical strains displayed the same feature whereas the remaining clinical strains reached a higher maximum cell density in the presence of carnitine with osmotic stress than in its absence with no stress. The physiological reasons and advantage of this difference are unclear. When exposed to conditions of severe acid stress (pH 2.5) for 2 h, only two L. monocytogenes strains (L66 and L78), both of meat origin, displayed significant reductions (P < 0.05) in number (3.51 and 2.79 log cfu, respectively). Acid-sensitive strains were not found among the clinical isolates examined, highlighting the importance of acid stress resistance in the infection process.

PMID:
10857542
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk