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J Clin Oncol. 2000 Jun;18(11):2193-200.

Population-based molecular detection of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

Author information

  • 1Departments of Medical Genetics and Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Erratum in

  • J Clin Oncol 2000 Oct 1;18(19):3456.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Cancer morbidity and mortality can be dramatically reduced by colonoscopic screening of individuals with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome, creating a need to identify HNPCC. We studied how HNPCC identification should be carried out on a large scale in a sensitive and efficient manner.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Colorectal cancer specimens from consecutive newly diagnosed patients were studied for microsatellite instability (MSI). Germline mutations in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes were searched for in MSI(+) individuals.

RESULTS:

Among 535 colorectal cancer patients, 66 (12%) were MSI(+). Among these, 18 (3.4% of the total) had disease-causing germline mutations in MLH1 or MSH2. Among these 18 patients, five were less than 50 years old, seven had a previous or synchronous colorectal or endometrial cancer, and 15 had at least one first-degree relative with colorectal or endometrial cancer. Notably, 17 (94%) of 18 patients had at least one of these three features, which were present in 22% of all 535 patients. Combining these data with a previous study of 509 patients, mutation-positive HNPCC accounts for 28 (2.7%) of 1,044 cases of colorectal cancer, predicting a greater than one in 740 incidence of mutation-positive individuals in this population.

CONCLUSION:

Large-scale molecular screening for HNPCC can be done by the described two-stage procedure of MSI determination followed by mutation analysis. Efficiency can be greatly improved by using three high-risk features to select 22% of all patients for MSI analysis, whereby only 6% need to have mutation analysis. Sensitivity is only slightly impaired by this procedure.

PMID:
10829038
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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