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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 May 23;97(11):6037-42.

Cerebral metabolic and cognitive decline in persons at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease.

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  • 1Center on Aging and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Neuropsychiatric Institute, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. gsmall@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

The major known genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), apolipoprotein E-4 (APOE-4), is associated with lowered parietal, temporal, and posterior cingulate cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with a clinical diagnosis of AD. To determine cognitive and metabolic decline patterns according to genetic risk, we investigated cerebral metabolic rates by using positron emission tomography in middle-aged and older nondemented persons with normal memory performance. A single copy of the APOE-4 allele was associated with lowered inferior parietal, lateral temporal, and posterior cingulate metabolism, which predicted cognitive decline after 2 years of longitudinal follow-up. For the 20 nondemented subjects followed longitudinally, memory performance scores did not decline significantly, but cortical metabolic rates did. In APOE-4 carriers, a 4% left posterior cingulate metabolic decline was observed, and inferior parietal and lateral temporal regions demonstrated the greatest magnitude (5%) of metabolic decline after 2 years. These results indicate that the combination of cerebral metabolic rates and genetic risk factors provides a means for preclinical AD detection that will assist in response monitoring during experimental treatments.

Comment in

PMID:
10811879
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC18554
Free PMC Article

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