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Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2000 May;7(3):366-70.

Induction of hypergammaglobulinemia and macrophage activation by silicone gels and oils in female A.SW mice.

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  • 1Departments of Surgery, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York 14621, USA. john.naim@viahealth.org

Abstract

Although most published epidemiological studies have found little evidence of systemic autoimmune disease associated with silicone breast implants, there still remains a question of whether silicones can cause local and/or systemic immune dysfunction. This study further investigates the effects of silicones on autoantibody and immunoglobulin production and macrophage activation in female A.SW mice. Sixty mice were divided among four treatment groups receiving a 0.5-ml intraperitoneal injection of either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), pristane, silicone gel, or silicone oil. Test bleeds were taken periodically for 6 months. In contrast to pristane, neither silicone gel nor silicone oil induced lupus-associated antinuclear autoantibodies (immunoglobulin G [IgG] anti-nRNP/Sm, Su, and ribosomal P) or lupus nephritis. However, serum IgM became elevated persistently within 1 month of silicone gel or silicone oil administration. Also, the level of IgG3 was clearly elevated in silicone oil-treated mice. In contrast, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b levels were not affected greatly by either silicone gel or oil. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages from silicone- and pristane-treated mice produced higher levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and IL-6 than those from PBS-treated mice after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. These results suggest that silicone gels and oils are capable of inducing hypergammaglobulinemia and activating macrophages in female A.SW mice.

PMID:
10799447
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC95880
Free PMC Article

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