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J Clin Invest. 2000 Apr;105(8):1057-65.

Loss of TGF-beta signaling contributes to autoimmune pancreatitis.

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  • 1Laboratory of Cell Regulation and Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Abstract

Recent observations suggest that immune response is involved in the development of pancreatitis. However, the exact pathogenesis underlying this immune-mediated response is still under debate. TGF-beta has been known to be an important regulating factor in maintaining immune homeostasis. To determine the role of TGF-beta in the initiation or progression of pancreatitis, TGF-beta signaling was inactivated in mouse pancreata by overexpressing a dominant-negative mutant form of TGF-beta type II receptor in the pancreas, under control of the pS2 mouse trefoil peptide promoter. Transgenic mice showed marked increases in MHC class II molecules and matrix metalloproteinase expression in pancreatic acinar cells. These mice also showed increased susceptibility to cerulein-induced pancreatitis. This pancreatitis was characterized by severe pancreatic edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, T- and B-cell hyperactivation, IgG-type autoantibodies against pancreatic acinar cells, and IgM-type autoantibodies against pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Therefore, TGF-beta signaling seems to be essential either in maintaining the normal immune homeostasis and suppressing autoimmunity or in preserving the integrity of pancreatic acinar cells.

PMID:
10772650
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC300828
Free PMC Article
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